gamification in learning
Video game developers have become very effective over the years at getting players addicted to their products, much like gambling gets its hooks into people. But while gambling and games get you hooked into potentially harmful habits, the ways by which they entice people to become addicted have the possibility to be extremely helpful in a positive and productive way when used in the right setting and with the right purpose. In the following article, we’ll explore how games are able to be so addictive, how gamifying learning can be effective for teaching, and how you can use reward based systems in the classroom. Games use a reward feedback system to encourage continual play. A sense of progress and growth keeps people coming back because they feel good when they accomplish something. Kids (and adults) play addictive games and become so obsessed that they buy hosting just to brag about what they’ve done, or rant about what they can’t do. Think about why gamers sink so many hours playing Call of Duty, or Skyrim, or even Flappy Bird. These games give such a great feeling of progress and power, that in turn send a rush of endorphins to…
intrinsic-motivation
Motivation is an important thing. It is the literal reason that anyone does anything of note. Without the drive to complete something, we would never get anything done! This motivation comes in two different forms: Intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation. Both forms are effective at encouraging someone to do something, but in separate ways. They each have value, but this article will focus on the benefits of the intrinsic factors. Here, we’ll be discussing the about what intrinsic and extrinsic motivation are, how to foster intrinsic motivation, and how teachers can use build good learning habits in the classroom by fostering this inspiration. Intrinsic motivation is the internal drive to do something because you yourself enjoy doing it, or because you find what you are doing interesting. It’s something that you really like and is internally rewarding. Extrinsic motivation, on the other hand, is the motivation to do something for external reasons, like to make someone else happy or to avoid some form of consequence. An easy example to help your understanding of the differences between the two is why some people might be reading this article. While some are reading it purely as a way to study a…